Arsène Wenger and the Spirit of Conquest

Despite being both a fan of Arsène Wenger, and his stubborn pursuit of some mad footballing vision only he can see, and a life-long Japanophile, i’ve never really investigated his erstwhile years stewarding J-League side Grampus Eight (now Nagoya Grampus).

Today however, whilst idly browsing the wikipedia entry for the Arsenal manager I came across the fact that he had written a book exclusively for the Japanese market, with the wonderful title Shōsha no Esupuri or “The Spirit of Conquest”, which “highlights his managerial philosophy, ideals and values, as well as his thoughts on Japanese football and the game as a whole.”

A hop skip and a jump to the Amazon page for the tome, and via the magic of Google Translate, we learn more:

Farewell and playback of Nagoya Grampus. Qualities essential role to play in the leader. What really rooted professional football in Japan. Proven track record spotless, well-honed sense of supervision. Based on the analytical skills and amazing powers of observation, with a view of the Japanese sense of surprise and the most sophisticated soccer. Why Did left the Japanese, and the Japanese choose him. One (1) year from the transfer electrifying. The coach also praised the Holy Land in England, Japan recalls and Proposal for the Future.

A cheap laugh, maybe, at the expense of poor translation, but there is something magical in the description of “the analytical skills and amazing powers of observation, with a view of the Japanese sense of surprise and the most sophisticated soccer.”